Stanford Social Innovation Review : Informing and inspiring leaders of social change

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The latest stories on social innovation, published each weekday

 

Government

The Lean Startup Goes to Washington

Evidence-based policy, iteration, and innovation are making their way into government.

 

Philanthropy

Measuring Impact Isn’t for Everyone

Collecting data to demonstrate your organization’s impact is great to do when you should, wasteful when you should not.

By Mary Kay Gugerty & Dean Karlan | Apr. 2, 2014
 
Meg_Busse

Foundations

Experimentation: A Shortcut to Innovation

Leading organizations are placing bets on action over rhetoric.

By Meg Busse | Apr. 1, 2014
 

Social Entrepreneurship

Seven Elements of Social Innovation

A new framework emerges for social innovation education.

By Ilaina Rabbat, with Roshan Paul | 2 | Apr. 1, 2014
 

Socially Responsible Business

Social Sabbaticals and the New Face of Leadership

A look at SAP’s corporate initiatives to develop new talent for work in emerging markets.

 
Kevin_Starr

Philanthropy

GiveThoughtfully: It Depends on Your Point of View

Bringing a discussion of cash transfers in for a landing.

By Kevin Starr & Laura Hattendorf | Mar. 28, 2014
 
Aspen_Baker

Social Entrepreneurship

Beyond Outrage: Using Dilemmas to Spur Change

Social entrepreneurs lead the way out of polarization through invention.

By Aspen Baker | 1 | Mar. 28, 2014
 

Government

A Sharing Economy Cliffhanger: What Will Governments Do?

Earlier this month, a group backed by companies including Airbnb and Taskrabbit began urging users to petition for changes in regulation—will politicians uphold the rules or loosen them? Or is there is a third option?

By Wingham Rowan | Mar. 27, 2014
 

Philanthropy

Broadening the Aperture of Measurement

What research can and does tell us about unconditional cash transfers.

By Jeremy Shapiro & Johannes Haushofer | 1 | Mar. 26, 2014
 

Philanthropy

Grantmaking, Public Policy…and Tums

Exemplary grantmakers follow evidence, not presumptions, and recognize that effective strategy requires transforming enough things, not everything.

By Michael M. Weinstein | Mar. 26, 2014