Stanford Social Innovation Review : Informing and inspiring leaders of social change

SUBSCRIBE | HELP

Urban Development

 

Social innovations that improve the health of cities

 
Boxcar_grocer_health_food

Delivering the Goods

Entrepreneurs are setting up shop in the nation's urban food deserts.

 
Xavier de Souza Briggs_The Neighborhood Project: Using Evolution to Improve My City, One Block at a Time_David Sloan Wilson_SSIR

Misapplying Theory

In his latest book, David Sloan Wilson argues that evolutionary theory should be used to illuminate and tackle urban problems.

 
Glenwood_green_acres_north_central_philedelphia_PHS_philedelphia_green_project_SSIR

Trees Fight Crime

A Philadelphia study connects green spaces to neighborhood safety.

By Jessica Ruvinsky | Spring 2012
 
image

Revitalizing Struggling American Cities

Living Cities is working with five US municipalities to develop an ecosystem for solving urban problems.

By Ben Hecht | 6 | Fall 2011
 
KaBOOM! How One
Man Built a Movement
to Save Play
Darell Hammond

Scaling Play

KaBOOM! How One Man Built a Movement to Save Play by Darell Hammond

Reviewed By Paul Connolly | Fall 2011
 
image

Networking for Sustainable Transport

EMBARQ, a network of sustainable transportation experts, has grown quickly,
thanks to impressive fundraising and the design of a model program.

By Brandon Keim | Fall 2011
 
CLIMATOPOLIS:
How Our Cities
Will Thrive in the
Hotter Future
Matthew E. Kahn

Climate Speculations

CLIMATOPOLIS: How Our Cities Will Thrive in the Hotter Future by Matthew E. Kahn

Reviewed By James L. Sweeney | Winter 2011
 
image

Here Comes the Neighborhood

A low-income Cleveland neighborhood works together to revitalize the community in an environmentally responsible way.

By Suzie Boss | Winter 2011
 
image

Integrating Youth Services

Governmental agencies in Oakland, Calif., are collaborating to serve at-risk children better, with good results.

By Sam Scott | 1 | Winter 2011
 
image

Putting More Fun into Play

In a new playground in Manhattan, "play associates" will encourage youthful creativity while reminding parents and nannies to take a giant step back.

By Suzie Boss | Fall 2009