Stanford Social Innovation Review : Informing and inspiring leaders of social change

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Food

 

Innovative ways to improve access to food resources

 

Local Warming

Global warming may end up helping some poor farmers who will be able to sell their crops for higher prices.

By Jessica Ruvinsky | Summer 2010
 
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Sell the Wind

What are social marketers to do when their target audience couldn’t care less about the change they want to make? Here's how one group got everyday people to care about alternative energy.

By Cathy L. Hartman & Edwin R. Stafford | Winter 2010
 
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Second Chances and a Third Bottom Line

Recycla Chile, Latin America’s first e-waste recycling company, reclaims value from discarded electronics and marginalized people.

By Tyche Hendricks | Winter 2010
 
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The Wrong Risks

By paying so much attention to managing their own risks, philanthropists are no longer attending to the marginalized people who risk so much to make change happen.

By Sheela Patel | 1 | Winter 2010
 

Research: The Business of Bribery

A new study from Indonesia shows that extortionists respond to market forces in much the same way as do lawful businesspeople.

By Alana Conner | Winter 2010
 
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Grow Your Own

Forget about luring big companies with tax incentives and subsidized space. Chris Gibbons focuses Littleton, Colorado's efforts on growing home-town businesses.

By Anne Stuhldreher | Winter 2010
 

What’s Next: Keeping an Eye on Parks

ParkScan, an interactive Web tool, enages residents as park monitors.

By Suzie Boss | Winter 2010
 
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What’s Next: Fresh Faces at City Hall

To halt the greying of municipal government, the City Hall Fellows program offers recent college graduates a year-long stint working on everyday challenges such as transportation, public works, and housing.

By Suzie Boss | Winter 2010
 

What’s Next: Out-Greening Your Neighbor

Nobody wants to be the biggest energy hog on the block.

By Suzie Boss | Winter 2010
 
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Ten Nonprofit Funding Models

For-profit executives use business models—such as "low-cost provider" or "the razor and the razor blade"—as a shorthand way to describe the way companies are built and sustained. Nonprofit executives are not as explicit about their funding models and have not had an equivalent lexicon—until now.

By William Landes Foster, Peter Kim, & Barbara Christiansen | 39 | Spring 2009