Stanford Social Innovation Review : Informing and inspiring leaders of social change

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Food

 

Innovative ways to improve access to food resources

 

A Win-Win for Haiti

Partners in Health and Abbott Laboratories are building a new plant in Corporant, Haiti to produce a therapeutic food called Nourimanba.

 
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Retailing with Heart

At Panera Cares cafés, there’s a donation box where customers pay on the honor system.

By Suzie Boss | 11 | Spring 2011
 
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Beyond the Purple Berry

Sambazon’s commitment to social entrepreneurship creates a fair market for farmers in the Amazon

By Ryan Black & Jeremy Black | Spring 2011
 
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Disseminating Orphan Innovations

Disseminating innovations takes a distinct, sophisticated skill set, one that often requires customizing the program to new circumstances, not replicating.

By Susan H. Evans & Peter Clarke | 2 | Winter 2011
 
THE COMING
FAMINE: The Global
Food Crisis and What
We Can Do to Avoid It
Julian Cribb

Food Solutions

The Coming Famine: The Global Food Crisis and What We Can Do to Avoid It by Julian Cribb

Reviewed By Janine Yorio | Winter 2011
 

Fermenting Innovation

New public-private partnerships have led to big leaps in the exportation of Argentinian wine.

By Jessica Ruvinsky | Summer 2010
 

Local Warming

Global warming may end up helping some poor farmers who will be able to sell their crops for higher prices.

By Jessica Ruvinsky | Summer 2010
 
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Sell the Wind

What are social marketers to do when their target audience couldn’t care less about the change they want to make? Here's how one group got everyday people to care about alternative energy.

By Cathy L. Hartman & Edwin R. Stafford | Winter 2010
 
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Second Chances and a Third Bottom Line

Recycla Chile, Latin America’s first e-waste recycling company, reclaims value from discarded electronics and marginalized people.

By Tyche Hendricks | Winter 2010
 
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The Wrong Risks

By paying so much attention to managing their own risks, philanthropists are no longer attending to the marginalized people who risk so much to make change happen.

By Sheela Patel | 1 | Winter 2010